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CSM X CMS: Entangled

CSM X CMS: Entangled | 14 – 17 June | MA Art and Science 2017

 

CSM X CMS: Entangled 

DATES: Wed 14 – Sat 17 June 2017

LOCATION: Four Corners Gallery, London, 121 Roman Road, E2 0QN, Bethnal Green

OPENING TIMES: Wed to Sat | 10.00 – 18.00

PRIVATE VIEW: Thurs 15 June | 18.00 – 20.30

A3-high res-CRN

Placing themselves firmly at the centre of contemporary Art and Science discourse, nineteen artists from Central Saint Martins respond to their December 2016 visit to CERN and the CMS detector in their exhibition at Four Corners Gallery, London, June 14-17, 2017. The striking array of work confirms that when creative minds grasp universal concepts, at the core of our material understanding of the universe, you can expect the unexpected.

About the Exhibition

Sculpture, film, printmaking, sound and art installations are just some of the outcomes from reflections on their surprising discoveries from the trip, including a rare look at the inside of the CMS detector experiment, particles in cloud chambers that may help us understand climate change, and the baffling quantity and randomness of data produced to confirm minute particle reactions.

Additionally, there is the memorable impression of the deeper social context of the institution itself. Often in parallel with what drives artists, scientists are striving to grasp the unknown and offer their discoveries to humanity in an ethos of sharing and openness. Artists recognise the exhilaration of new perspectives relating to what we are made of and, also seek to make fresh connections and intuitive leaps in understanding.

In preparation for the exhibition, between 8-11 May a number of the artists returned to CERN for further research and collaboration with the physicists. During the exhibition workshops, artist talks and other activities will take place in the gallery space. We are grateful to CMS and art@cms for making our visits possible.

 

Participating Artists

Allison Barclay-Michaels, Stephen Bennett, Joshua Bourke, Amy Knight, Reggy Liu, Maria Macc, Fiona Morf, Jill Mueller, Priya Odedra, Helen O’Donoghue, Yun Peng, Lisa Pettibone, Heather Scott, Hannah Scott, Nicolas Strappini, Olga Suchanova, Bekk Wells, Victoria Westerman and guest artist Andy Charalambous (CSM lecturer and CERN consultant in association with Imperial College, London)

 

THIRD MATTER | 24-28 May | MA Art and Science degree show 2017

THIRD MATTER

Central Saint Martins’ graduates showcase innovative and thought-provoking work from the interdisciplinary MA Art and Science programme.

DATES | Wed 24th – Sun 28th May 2017

LOCATION | Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 3rd Floor,

1 Granary Square, London N1C 4AA, United Kingdom

OPENING TIMES | Wed to Fri 12.00 – 20.00 | Sat to Sun 12.00 – 18.00

 

THIRD MATTER, this year’s MA Art and Science graduates at Central Saint Martins, present a stimulating event showcasing their unique insight into contemporary issues. With an eclectic mix of backgrounds, and inspired by their individual connections with the evolving area of art and science, works are responding to diverse topics including: Consciousness through sound; non-verbal communication across dimensions; alienation and reclaiming the self, to nostalgia and memory provoked by smell. The body is investigated through the tropes of scientific enquiry and models of A.I. and considerations of genetics and evolutionary pressure. The effects of how we co-habit with the landscape and nature are explored through themes of Anthropocene, pollution and interfaces of synthetic and organic matter and questions relating to the evidence of ‘being’ are raised from visualizing particle energy release to the existence of black-holes.

Provocative, challenging and engaging, the exhibition will include works developed from research undertaken by private enquiry and through collaborations with scientists. With student backgrounds spanning electro-engineering, fine art, film production, graphic design, photography to psychology, the creative relationships between art and science are explored in an individual approach expressed by a diverse range of media.

EXHIBITING
Agnese Basova | Josh Chow | Monika Dorniak | Michelle von Mandel | Maria McCullough (Macc) | Juan Perez | Leon Radschinski-Gorman | Virginie Serneels | Iting Shih | Hannah Scott | Heather Scott | Nicolas Strappini | Neus Torres Tamarit | Yu-Ji

  

THIRD MATTER ACTION DAY
Saturday 27 May, 14:00 – 17:00. The exhibition is accompanied by an afternoon of performances, demonstrations and conversations.

Free event but please book to reserve a place here 

 

Visit www.artsciencecsm.com and social media for the latest information: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram.

 

Open Studio – Wednesday 7 December

MA Art and Science 

Open Studio

Wednesday 7 December

2-8pm

Come and see work in progress, experiments and performances from forty interdisciplinary practitioners exploring the interconnections between art and science.

Central Saint Martins Archway Campus
Elthorne Studios
9-15 Elthorne Road
London N19 4AJ

For details of scheduled events and up to date information check event info on Facebook

Open Studio 2016

Open Studio 2016

Forced Connections and Rules of Random

How restrictions can make us more creative in art and teaching

Words by Stephen Bennett, with workshop observations from Lisa Pettibone and quotes from participants. Photos by Çağlar Tahiroğlu.

 

Rules of Random, demonstrating a lesson on 'Antarctic scuba diving to techno heads using a sleep mask'

Rules of Random, demonstrating a lesson on ‘Antarctic scuba diving to techno heads using a sleep mask’

 

It is October 2016. The leaves are falling, yet it is a time of fresh promise for first-year students on Central Saint Martins’ masters programme in Art and Science. The new students are naturally a bit anxious, keen to impress their course leaders and their fellow students. What will their first artwork be? How to ensure it really shines? Perhaps stick with tried and tested methods, the kind of thing which gained entry to the programme in the first place. That worked well after all. But what is the point of joining a MA just to do the same old thing?

Forced Connection artwork by MA Art and Science students, in Practices of Enquiry exhibition, Cookhouse Gallery, Chelsea College of Art, UAL

Forced Connection artwork by MA Art and Science students, in Practices of Enquiry exhibition, Cookhouse Gallery, Chelsea College of Art, UAL

 

Second week, and the course leaders, Nathan Cohen and Heather Barnett, lull the students into a entertaining exercise. Sitting in groups, the students are asked to brainstorm lists of subject matter for art – death, immigration, philosophy, alienation. ‘Black holes!’ someone shouts. This is getting quite fun. Next, different methods for producing art. Painting, sculpting, drawing. But what about data experiments or tasting – how can that be practical? Finally, a list of materials to use in the production of art. Students are warmed up now. Rubber, plastic, cement… bacteria! Sports equipment!!

 

Use the hammer to smash

the patriarchy walnut!

 

You may see what is about to happen – but the students didn’t. Heather delivers the coup de grace. Randomly assigning numbers, each student ends up with a unique combination of ‘matter-method-material’. This is the first project brief of the MA: to develop artwork based upon the ‘forced connections’ of a chance group of three words.

The initial result is… uproar amongst the students. But then, with a bit of coaching and support, the studio starts germinating some unusual pieces. Cola cans cling to the window. Folded paper sprouts from a wall. Knitted cushions appear and then start multiplying. A month later, and students are explaining works about immigration, developed through interviews, using bacteria as a material. A collaboration results in painted rocks, telling us about philosophy. Ink dripping down folded paper is a metaphor for alienation. Plastic, painted, reveals insights about communication networks. Just as the first crit is wrapping up, Heather delivers another bombshell. There is an opportunity to show these experimental pieces in a London gallery in a week’s time…

Forced Connection artwork by MA Art and Science student Stephen Bennett connecting 'Immigration | Interviews | Bacteria'

Forced Connection artwork by MA Art and Science student Stephen Bennett connecting ‘Immigration | Interviews | Bacteria’

 

The display is part of University of the Arts London’s recent Practices of Enquiry, an exhibition of experimental enquiry-based learning across UAL, featuring teaching methods from all colleges. Photos of the in-situ art are studded through this blog. The art is intended to inspire and provoke teaching staff across UAL. This is most evident in the Rules of Random workshop run by Heather. This event, for UAL teaching staff, uses the same techniques as the ‘forced connections’ project.

 

“How do you send an

orange into space?”

 

This time unsuspecting participants brainstorm a list of ‘unusual groups of students’, ‘difficult subject matter’, and select random objects. The MA students are interspersed in the groups, now playing the role of coach. They help groups design lesson plans to teach mathematical pattern recognition to traditional wine makers using a compass. Participants consider how to use dried orange slices to teach astrophysics to 16 year olds. Ever used a walnut to teach sex education to linguists? What about using a blindfold to teach technoheads about Antarctic scuba diving? You can see some of the results in this blog.

Rules of random, 'Devise a lesson on sex education to linguists using walnuts'

Rules of random, ‘Devise a lesson on sex education to linguists using walnuts’

 

The two sister exercises – Forced Connections in the studio, Rules of Random in the gallery – had a number of features in common. Perhaps most obviously they are conduits for unlocking creativity. Everyone can get stuck in a rut, whether producing art, teaching or working in an office. Restricting options can force lateral thinking and resourcefulness. Sometimes we are faced with two many choices or methods, and the possibilities can be paralysing. Sometimes – especially when doing something we are supposed to be good at – we live in fear of failure. But, when forced to use a sieve to teach tradesmen about crime, the failure becomes almost inevitable, and this permits a great willingness to take risk.

 

“What is the

essence of a feather?”

 

A number of the CSM students are now incorporating the initially ridiculed combinations of matter-method-material into their main practice. Bacteria and immigration becomes a starting point for examining the semiotics around human relations. Folding and alienation has resulted paper-based in sculptures which morph between two and three dimensions. Similarly, feedback from the Rules of Random workshop participants was that it has opened up new teaching approaches. Food can be an excellent way of teaching 16 year olds about abstract concepts. Participatory lessons, especially ones involving blindfolds or smashing nuts, become instantly memorable. Objects can help focus learning into specific issues in a much broader topic.

Rules of Random, handling given objects to generate ideas

Rules of Random, handling given objects to generate ideas

These techniques can be adapted into practically any environment, with any task in mind. Please try them out, see if it can unlock a problem or open up a new line of enquiry. And remember: you must use whichever random combination you get!

The Rules of Random workshop was developed as part of Practices of Enquiry, a two-year enhancement project at UAL exploring how we create the conditions for enquiry to flourish within our ‘creative, curious, critical curricula’.

The workshop was devised and delivered by MA Art and Science lecturer, Heather Barnett, working with students: Olivia Bargman, Stephen Bennett, Joshua Bourke, Lisa Pettibone, Çağlar Tahiroğlu, and Bekk Wells.

 

 

Gallery from our Art and Science fundraising workshops

MA Art and Science fundraising workshops, March 2016

 

In March 2016, MA Art and Science staff and students ran a range of creative workshops exploring observations and experimentations in art and science at Central Saint Martins.

With many sessions selling out, participants gained some knowledge and hands-on experience with a range of techniques, including slime mould problem solving, microbial image making, nebula bottling, water mapping, microscopy inspired glass sculpting and chemigram making. The creative art and science workshops were designed for adults and young people.

All proceeds went towards the MA Art and Science Degree Show, Unfolding Realities which opens to the public 25-29 May 2016.

 

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To see details of each individual workshop see them listed here.

 

PRESS RELEASE: UNFOLDING REALITIES MA Art & Science Degree Show

New innovative work by pioneering Central Saint Martins graduates, that challenges the concept of fine art through interdisciplinary practice.

DATES | Wed 25th – Sun 29th May 2016

LOCATION | Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, London N1C 4AA, United Kingdom

OPENING TIMES | Wed to Fri 12.00 – 20.00 | Sat to Sun 12.00 – 18.00

UNFOLDING REALITIES presents the work of 20 MA Art and Science graduates at Central Saint Martins. Since its inception in 2011 this pioneering course, the first of its kind, has provided a unique global platform for students across a wide range of fields, on which they extend and contribute to the expanding interdisciplinary branch of knowledge – Art and Science. Responding to this fast emerging territory for collaborative practice which redefines creativity across disciplines, UNFOLDING REALITIES practitioners from fine art, design, photography, neuroscience, art history, mathematics, choreography and architecture have been inspired by their individual connections and observations of the world and the challenge of interrogating this beyond disciplinary boundaries.

Bold, innovative work and research includes a large interactive multimedia sculpture where glass neurons provoke an out of body experience (JENNIFER WALSH); the exploration of paper fold- ing as a visual representation of the Theory of Everything (MARTA PANILLA); the launch of a transdiscipline through the uncovering of 300 year old bacteria collected by an antiquarian book (SARAH CRASKE); the exploration of the effect on our bodies when perceiving Earth from a distance (ALEKSANDRA BORYS); the re-presentation of the human body as a microbial land- scape (MELLISSA FISHER); the exploration of ‘Emergence Theory’ through Constructivist inspired large-scale screen-prints (CHARLOTTE WHISTON); and reflections on the advances in surgical techniques and increasing availability (MARY HELEN MAC).

This exhibition showcases works that have developed from experimentation with integrative techniques, long-term collaborations with scientists, use of familiar materials as unusual artistic media, and influences from historical and current scientific inquiry.

EDITORS NOTES

CONTACT INFO
For more information and further images please contact: maartscience2016@gmail.com Hashtag #UNFOLDING_REALITIES
Webpage http://www.artsciencecsm.com/
Facebook Event https://www.facebook.com/events/1664988003764588/
Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/artsciencecsm/
Twitter @artsciencecsm

EXHIBITING
Aleksandra Borys | Lorraine Clarke | Lucy Crowder | Julius Colwyn | Sarah Craske | Mellissa Fisher | Stephanie Herbert | Mandy Hreus | Keun Wook Ji | Peiwen Li | Silvia Krupinska | Mary Helen Mack | Marta Pinilla Martinez | Carla Mancillas Serna | Grace Stokes | Jana Va- lencic | Mira Varg | Jennifer Walsh | Charlotte Whiston | Stephanie Wong

MA ART AND SCIENCE
This pioneering 2 year postgraduate course responds to a fast-emerging territory for in- terdisciplinary and collaborative art practice. The MA Art and Science gives students an oppor- tunity to interrogate the creative relationships between art and science and how they can be communicated. They explore different approaches to making and presenting their work with the aim of proposing and realising innovative outcomes in practice and research. www.arts.ac.uk/ csm/courses/postgraduate/ma-art-and-science/

UNFOLDING REALTIES SYMPOSIUM
The degree show will be accompanied by a series of events including tours, demonstrations and a one day Symposium on Saturday 28th May 11:00 – 16:00. Students and external practitioners within the field of Art and Science will share ideas and motivations in a day of talks, activities and discussion. Visit www.artsciencecsm.com for the latest information.

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS

Degree Show One 2016 (24th – 29th May) will showcase the School of Fine Art courses: BA (Hons) Fine Art; Postgraduate Art Programme at CSM (MA Fine Art, MA Art andScience, MA Photography, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy). Central Saint Mar- tins is internationally renowned for the creative energy of its students,staff and graduates with an out- standing reputation for educating foundation, undergraduate, postgraduate and research students across art, design and performance. Fundamental to study at the College are experimentation, innovation, risk- taking, questioning and discovery, within a highly supportive learning environment. Alumni include, Matthew Collings, James Dyson, Gilbert and George, Anthony Gormley, Raqib Shaw, and Yinka Shoni- bare. Central Saint Martins is part of University of the Arts London, an international centre for innovative teaching and research in arts, design, fashion, communication and the performing arts. The University is made up of six Colleges: Camberwell College of Arts,Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London College of Communication, London College of Fashion and Wimbledon College of Arts

Our Laughter will Drown Your Sorrows: MA Interim Show, 18-20 March

NEXT WEEK: Our Laughter will Drown Your Sorrows

MA Interim Show at The Laundry, Hackney

Students and staff of the Year 1  MA Art & Science, MA Fine Art and MA Photography, cordially invite you to their MA Interim Show :  Our Laughter will Drown Your Sorrows   

Our Laughter will Drown Your Sorrows showcases the work of over 70 CSM postgraduate art students.    The students are all in the first year of their Postgraduate courses,  MA Art & Science, MA Fine Art, and MA Photography.

The underground post industrial setting of The Laundry space in London’s east end provides the perfect backdrop for contemporary work that considers what it means to make in today’s bleak economic and political landscape.  Working as an artists today in London is undoubtedly challenging, and these emerging artists address the problems with a dynamic and politicised vigour.

The students work across the full scope of media available to artists today, including, painting, sculpture, video, performance, and interactive works etc.  Their interests are diverse and address a range of ideas including identity, celebrity, chaos and excess. What brings these works together is a shared sense of urgency, the art shown in Our Laughter Will Drown Your Sorrows is work that needs to be made and needs to be shown.

As part of the exhibition there will be a collaborative fanzine produced and manufactured on site by the students themselves. Please join us for an event that is sure to be exciting and confrontational.           

Open to the Public: Friday 18 March – Sunday 20 March   11am – 5pm

The Laundry, 2-8 Warburton Road, London E8 3FN

Event Info

 

Bottle your own nebulae by Carla Mancillas Serna

Art and Science Creative Workshops – now booking

MA Art and Science staff and students are offering a range of creative workshops exploring observations and experimentations in art and science on Saturday 5 and 12 March, at Central Saint Martins.

Come along and get hands on with slime mould problem solving, microbial image making, nebula bottling, water mapping, microscopy inspired glass sculpting and chemigram making. Creative art and science workshops are designed for adults and young people. Young people must be 12+ and accompanied by an adult.

All proceeds go towards the MA Art and Science Degree Show (open to the public 25-29 May 2016).

Cost: £14 adult | £12 UAL staff/student | £9 child/senior/unemployed
(discounts available when you book two or more workshops, applied at checkout)

See details and booking links below…

Looking Glass by Jenny Walsh

Looking Glass by Jenny Walsh

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #1

Through the Looking Glass & Microbial Me

5 March 2016, 11:00 – 13:00

Through the Looking Glass (with Jenny Walsh)
Glass played a crucial role in enabling man to see beyond the visual eye. In this workshop discover how skilled craftsmen learned to grind glass and change its composition to revolutionise the way we investigate the microscopic world. Inspired by microscopic images each participant will be invited to create their own microscope slide using glass confetti and stringers.

and

Microbial Me (with Mellissa Fisher)
Learn about the invisible world on your skin, think about your own microbes and design your own microbial portrait using a painting technique and collage. Each person will have their own microbial face to take home along with knowledge about bacteria!

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

Attentive Topologies and Water Mapping by Beckie Leach & Silvia Krupinska

Attentive Topologies and Water Mapping by Beckie Leach & Silvia Krupinska

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #2

Attentive Topologies & Water Mapping

5 March 2016, 14:00 – 16:00

Attentive Topologies and Water Mapping (with Beckie Leach & Silvia Krupinska)
Focusing on the canal area next to Granary Square in Kings Cross (in front of Central Saint Martins), this workshop will guide you through a series of attentiveness exercises exploring sound and water. You will find out about phenomenological approaches to artistic practice and water/sound quality, and create expressive maps capturing the movement of water and sound.

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

Slime mould problem solving a maze by Heather Barnett

Slime mould problem solving a maze by Heather Barnett

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #3

Slime Mould Boot Camp

12 March 2016, 11:00 – 13:00

Slime Mould Boot Camp (with Heather Barnett)
The slime mould, Physarum polycephalum, is a small brainless protozoa with surprising intelligence. Used as a model organism in many areas of scientific research it also makes for a great creative collaborator. In this workshop you will discover the fascinating role this single celled organism has to play in the cultures of science and art, and design a practical experiment to test its capabilities and problem-solving skills. Each participant will take home a new microbial pet to observe and experiment with.

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

Chemigram Magic by Don Li and Mira Varg

Chemigram Magic by Don Li and Mira Varg

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #4

The Chemigram Spell & Bottle Your Own Nebula

12 March 2016, 14:00 – 16:00

The Chemigram Spell (with Don Li & Mira Varg)
Offering some fresh air in the midst of a digital age, the workshop explores the potential of analogue photographic processes through a hands-on session, working with tools and materials that are unconventionally related to photographic processes – including paint brushes, syringes, honey and varnish. Come and experience the magic of an alternative image making process.

and

Bottle Your Own Nebula (with Carla Mancillas Serna)
Nebulas are massive clouds of interstellar dust in space, mainly composed of helium and hydrogen and other chemical elements. They are also known as “stellar nurseries”. These clouds of different shapes, sizes and colours coalesce in space, collapse and give birth to stars and planetary systems, like our own solar system. Learn about how nebulae form and create your own bottled cloud inspired by the colours and textures of cosmic dust.

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

Space ship hosts planning meeting for MA Art and Science Degree Show

 

For 4 days in early February MA Art and Science set up house in an a 1960s space ship to collectively explore the curation and design of the up coming degree show (25-29 May 2016). Key questions centred around how to build a coherent show that celebrates the diversity of individual approach while also revealing the shared creative and intellectual threads that are emerging within the group. Stephanie Wong records the events that took place between 8 – 11 February in the Futuro House.

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Last week the second years of MA Art and Science spent four days in Futuro House, a retro space ship located on the terrace of the CSM King’s Cross building. Having just finished the intense experience of dissertation writing this was the first opportunity for everyone to come together and plan for the degree show. On the agenda was curation, design, research and the sharing of ideas.

Like the previous two years the degree show will be taking place in the Crossing at King’s Cross. This is the entrance to the main Central Saint Martins building and is technically a public walkway. With a height of four floors and an imposing breadth this huge space poses unique opportunities, as well as serious challenges, one of the biggest being we are not allowed to hang anything from the walls and the ceilings. What does this mean? In order to display any work we have to build a structure to do so.

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Fortunately for us, due to the eclectic nature of the course there are two students with architectural backgrounds, both of whom had been working hard to come up with a design for a structure that would display our work. Facilitated by course leader Nathan Cohen and artist Susan Aldworth the first day was spent discussing the design and sharing concepts for each of our work and how this would best be displayed.

The second day kicked off with a lego building workshop run by Graham Barton. This is not normal lego but architectural lego and the completely white building blocks are used conceptually, constructing whilst holding questions in mind. Tailor made for us these were: What is my practice? What do I aspire to present as part of the degree show? What are my aspirations for the curation of the degree show? The appeal of lego seems to transcend age with the hands on building being quite meditative. Lead tutor Heather Barnett led us through the day which allowed each individual to really question what we want and think much more freely and thoughtfully about our work.

12718339_10156627735330089_2142243747061917062_n copy

 

The final day involved another visit from Susan Aldworth and tutor Adrian Holme. This was spent discussing how to incorporate research and process into the curation of the show. What became apparent in the conversations was that the cross-disciplinary collaborations that make this course unusual need to be presented. Furthermore, art and science as a notion requires more than exhibiting finished pieces, in which the methodologies have equal if not crucial importance to the final meaning.

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Being locked in a spaceship for a week turned out to be an incredibly fruitful experience. Some of the developments included: final design for the structure, a film that will be made documenting the degree show process, symposium plans, ‘brain dump’ for the title and fundraising ideas. The most exciting outcome was the enthusiasm and motivation of the group as a whole.

So watch this space…

(no pun intended)

 

 

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